M.D.Muthukumaraswamy

Director

National Folklore Support Centre

No.508, Fifth Floor, “Kaveri complex”

96, Mahatma Gandhi Road

Nungambakkam

Chennai- 600034

http://www.indianfolklore.org/

Advertisements

6 Responses to “About Me”

  1. Pandian Says:

    இந்த குட்டி கதையை தயவு கூர்ந்து தமிழில் மொழி பெயர்த்து விளக்க வேண்டுகிறோம் !!!
    அன்புடன்
    பாண்டியன்

    BOOK : THE ALCHEMIST
    AUTHOR : Paulo Coelho

    PROLOGUE

    THE ALCHEMY PICKED UP A BOOK THAT SOMEONE IN THE caravan had brought. Leafing through the pages, he found a story about Narcissus.
    The alchemist knew the legend of Narcissus, a youth who knelt daily beside a lake to contemplate his own beauty. He was so fascinated by himself that, one morning, he fell into the lake and drowned. At the spot where he fell, a flower was born, which was called the narcissus.
    But this was not how the author of the book ended the story.
    He said that when Narcissus dies, the goddesses of the forest appeared and found the lake, which had been fresh water, transformed into a lake of salty tears.
    “Why do you weep?” the goddesses asked.
    “ I weep for Narcissus.” The lake replied.
    “Ah, it is no surprise that you week for Narcissus” they said, “for though we always perceived him in the forest, you alone could contemplate his beauty close at hand.”
    “But…Was Narcissus beautiful?”, the lake asked.
    “Who better than you to know that?” the goddesses said in wonder. :After all, it was by your banks that he knelt each day to contemplate himself!”
    The lake was silent for some time. Finally, it said:
    “I weep for Narcissus, but I never noticed that Narcissus was beautify. I weep because, each time he knelt beside my banks, I could see, in the depths of his eyes, my own beauty reflected.”
    “What a lovely story”, the alchemist thought.
    ———————————
    Please note that, although I typed it here from the book, it is already in a lot of websites and hence hopefully would not be a copyright violation….
    ———————————
    Older reference – What is the real difference between this one and THE alchemist version…
    Oscar Wilde: Essays and Lectures
    POEMS IN PROSE
    3. THE DISCIPLE

    When Narcissus died the pool of his pleasure changed from a cup of sweet waters into a cup of salt tears, and the Oreads came weeping through the woodland that they might sing to the pool and give it comfort.
    And when they saw that the pool had changed from a cup of sweet waters into a cup of salt tears, they loosened the green tresses of their hair and cried to the pool and said, ‘We do not wonder that you should mourn in this manner for Narcissus, so beautiful was he.’
    ‘But was Narcissus beautiful?’ said the pool.
    ‘Who should know that better than you?’ answered the Oreads. ‘Us did he ever pass by, but you he sought for, and would lie on your banks and look down at you, and in the mirror of your waters he would mirror his own beauty.’
    And the pool answered, ‘But I loved Narcissus because, as he lay on my banks and looked down at me, in the mirror of his eyes I saw ever my own beauty mirrored.’

  2. Pandian Says:

    MDM Sir – Did you notice this? Appreciate your reply..please also post your e-mail so we can send such requests to you…


    • Please remove your comments from the about me page and send them as mail

      • gpandian Says:

        இந்த குட்டி கதையை தயவு கூர்ந்து தமிழில் மொழி பெயர்த்து விளக்க வேண்டுகிறோம் !!! அன்புடன் பாண்டியன்

        BOOK : THE ALCHEMIST AUTHOR : Paulo Coelho

        PROLOGUE

        THE ALCHEMY PICKED UP A BOOK THAT SOMEONE IN THE caravan had brought. Leafing through the pages, he found a story about Narcissus. The alchemist knew the legend of Narcissus, a youth who knelt daily beside a lake to contemplate his own beauty. He was so fascinated by himself that, one morning, he fell into the lake and drowned. At the spot where he fell, a flower was born, which was called the narcissus. But this was not how the author of the book ended the story. He said that when Narcissus dies, the goddesses of the forest appeared and found the lake, which had been fresh water, transformed into a lake of salty tears. “Why do you weep?” the goddesses asked. “ I weep for Narcissus.” The lake replied. “Ah, it is no surprise that you week for Narcissus” they said, “for though we always perceived him in the forest, you alone could contemplate his beauty close at hand.” “But…Was Narcissus beautiful?”, the lake asked. “Who better than you to know that?” the goddesses said in wonder. :After all, it was by your banks that he knelt each day to contemplate himself!” The lake was silent for some time. Finally, it said: “I weep for Narcissus, but I never noticed that Narcissus was beautify. I weep because, each time he knelt beside my banks, I could see, in the depths of his eyes, my own beauty reflected.” “What a lovely story”, the alchemist thought. ——————————— Please note that, although I typed it here from the book, it is already in a lot of websites and hence hopefully would not be a copyright violation…. ——————————— Older reference – What is the real difference between this one and THE alchemist version… Oscar Wilde: Essays and Lectures POEMS IN PROSE 3. THE DISCIPLE

        When Narcissus died the pool of his pleasure changed from a cup of sweet waters into a cup of salt tears, and the Oreads came weeping through the woodland that they might sing to the pool and give it comfort. And when they saw that the pool had changed from a cup of sweet waters into a cup of salt tears, they loosened the green tresses of their hair and cried to the pool and said, ‘We do not wonder that you should mourn in this manner for Narcissus, so beautiful was he.’ ‘But was Narcissus beautiful?’ said the pool. ‘Who should know that better than you?’ answered the Oreads. ‘Us did he ever pass by, but you he sought for, and would lie on your banks and look down at you, and in the mirror of your waters he would mirror his own beauty.’ And the pool answered, ‘But I loved Narcissus because, as he lay on my banks and looked down at me, in the mirror of his eyes I saw ever my own beauty mirrored.’

  3. Pandian Says:

    Dear Dir –
    I am trying to delete this and unfortunately cannot do this. Could you please kindly delete this, as you are the owner of this blog, and write a blog post perhaps so others can get the benefit of reading this.
    Appreciate your insight
    /Pandian

  4. Alice Angel Says:

    Hi sir. Trying to reach you regarding a historical timeline


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: